trademark wars

The Cronut Contenders: Dunkin' Donuts, Crumbs Bake Shop and #NotaCronut

Posted by Shirley Brady on October 27, 2014 07:02 PM

Just as New York-based pastry chef Dominique Ansel is launching his new book—called, fittingly, The Secret Recipes—comes news that Dunkin' Donuts is launching a Croissant Donut, which sounds an awful lot like Ansel's now-trademarked Cronut.

Only, as the Associated Press reports, Dunkin' doesn't want anyone calling it a cronut.

As John Costell, Dunkin's president of global marketing and innovation, told AP's Candice Choi

"that bakers around the country have been mixing doughnuts and croissants for at least 20 years. He said Dunkin' is constantly tracking consumer and bakery trends and has been looking at pastry 'combinations' for several years now.  'Are we copying a specific bakery in New York? The answer is no,' Costello (told AP)."

According to Choi, the Not-a-Cronut will be available in November for a limited time at $2.49 each (vs. Ansel's $5.00 Cronuts), and follows the brand's test of "a croissant-doughnut in South Korea it dubbed a New York Pie Donut" last year.Continue reading...

sports in the spotlight

Huawei Announces First US Sports Team Sponsorship: The Washington Redskins

Posted by Mark J. Miller on October 24, 2014 04:11 PM

Washington's NFL team, which bears an increasingly controversial moniker, has found itself a new friend—with deep pockets.

Huawei Enterprise USA, the American division of Huawei, the Chinese telecommunications and network equipment provider that is the third largest cell-phone manufacturer on the globe, has announced a multiyear sponsorship of the Washington Redskins.

The tech giant, which debuted at No. 94 as the first Chinese brand to make brandchannel owner Interbrand’s Best Global Brands report, is also now the “Official Technology Partner” of the team, according to a press release.Continue reading...

outdoor advertising

Out of Home But Not Out of Sight, CBS Outdoor Rebrands as Outfront Media

Posted by Sheila Shayon on October 21, 2014 02:42 PM

CBS Outdoor, one of the largest lessors of advertising space on out-of-home advertising structures and sites across the U.S., is rebranding as Outfront Media, marking yet another step in its larger-scale corporate transformation. This new identity supports efforts to position the company at the forefront of the growing out-of-home advertising sector.  

"Outfront captures exactly who we are as a completely reenergized company and where we'll be with innovative technology and creativity for our advertising clients," said Jeremy Male, CEO. "Our bold new identity—deployed nationwide from Times Square to the Sunset Strip—also represents the unmatched audience that our prime assets will deliver as we elevate our business and industry to new heights."

The rebrand follows a successful year, including an IPO in March, separation from CBS Corporation in June, conversion to a REIT in July, and the acquisition of outdoor assets from Van Wagner in October. It also follows the recent rebranding of outdoor advertising rival Clear Channel to iHeartMedia. Continue reading...

trademark wars

In Gilt v. Gilt Trademark Spat, There's Guilt Enough for Both Sides

Posted by Dale Buss on October 16, 2014 10:01 AM

Less-than-robust trademark protection by brands can result in the needless spending of a lot of money on legal fees—and even personal "heartbreak."

That's the lesson of a cautionary tale about a lack of trademark vigilance told by the Trademarkologist website in the case of a dispute between Gilt Groupe, the giant members-only discount retailer known for its "flash-sale" business concept that operates Gilt.com, and Gilt, a tiny Portland, Oregon, jewelry store.

It seems, according to the site, that the name "Gilt" was first used by Paula Bixel's jewelry store in 1998. But while registering it with the Oregon Secretary of State, Bixel apparently didn't log the trademark with the US federal government, which wouldn't have cost much to do.Continue reading...

tech in the spotlight

Microsoft Reveals Windows 10

Posted by Shirley Brady on September 30, 2014 05:07 PM

Microsoft announced the new Windows operating system today: Windows 10. Billed as "The Future of Windows," it boasts a new Start menu, multiple desktops, and improved multi-tasking, in addition to:

Windows 10 represents the first step of a whole new generation of Windows. Windows 10 unlocks new experiences for customers to work, play and connect. Windows 10 embodies what our customers (both consumers and enterprises) demand and what we will deliver.

Windows 10 will run across an incredibly broad set of devices – from the Internet of Things, to servers in enterprise datacenters worldwide. Some of these devices have 4 inch screens – some have 80 inch screens – and some don’t have screens at all. Some of these devices you hold in your hand, others are ten feet away. Some of these devices you primarily use touch/pen, others mouse/keyboard, others controller/gesture – and some devices can switch between input types.

We’re not talking about one UI to rule them all – we’re talking about one product family, with a tailored experience for each device.

For some Windows 8 users eagerly anticipating the new release, there was just one question: What happened to Windows 9?

See Windows VP Joe Belfiores's twitty response to the naming speculation, along with his video explaining more about the new Windows. Continue reading...

rebranding

Clear Channel Tunes Out Radio, Pumps Up the Volume With iHeartMedia Rebrand

Posted by Penelope Davis on September 17, 2014 05:04 PM

Of the many ways a brand can signal change, changing its name is one of the most significant—particularly for a company as large as Clear Channel Communications, which has just rebranded to iHeartMedia.

The move is intended to align with a sharper focus on digital channels and growth opportunities, and firmly position the San Antonio, Texas-based radio operator as a multiplatform, mass media company. The new name clearly borrows awareness from its six-year-old iHeartRadio brand, now associated with not only an app and digital offerings, but also a high-profile annual music festival and awards show.

As its corporate rebranding press release points out, Clear Channel is not "just" an operator of 859 US radio stations, but an integrated and evolving ecosystem of media platforms, spanning broadcast radio, digital radio, mobile, social, TV, outdoor advertising and live events. So why leverage a sub-brand's equity to change the parent company's corporate identity?Continue reading...

tech in the spotlight

Apple Naming Evolves With Move From iThings to Things

Posted by Claire Falloon on September 9, 2014 07:08 PM

Forget the iWatch. In the much-anticipated unveiling of Apple’s latest and greatest products and offerings, another more subtle but no less significant game-changer was revealed: the brand's new—or at least evolving—naming convention.

Previously the owner of all things “i,” Apple today moved the needle towards its masterbrand by announcing the new Pay mobile payments platform and Watch smartwatch. While still keeping "i" as part of its iPhone line, with iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus revealed today, Apple's naming evolution is interesting on a number of levels.Continue reading...

trademark wars

Chanel vs. Chanel: Coco's Brand Steps Off the Runway and Into the Courtroom

Posted by Courtney Cantor on September 4, 2014 04:04 PM

Chanel is ubiquitous—on the runway each fashion week, in its boutiques lining Fifth Avenue and Rodeo Drive, and now in the courtroom as it seeks to uphold its trademark rights against a little-known salon and spa in Indiana. Merrillville, Indiana, to be precise.

According to papers filed in the US District Court in Hammond, Indiana, Chanel Inc. has filed a trademark infringement action against Chanel’s Salon, arguing that the salon is benefiting from an association with the chi-chi brand’s reputation. The brand also claims it has sent cease and desist letters that have been ignored.

The fame of the Chanel trademark is hardly disputable, a factor weighing in the luxury brand’s favor. When the average consumer thinks of Chanel, images of that expensive interlocking C logo are likely to come to mind. The strength of the Chanel trademark is only one factor, however, that the court would consider in deciding whether the salon’s use is confusing to the public and therefore infringing on the brand’s rights.Continue reading...

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