corporate citizenship

adidas Group Promotes Human Rights Standards for Factory Workers

Posted by Sheila Shayon on November 6, 2014 04:14 PM

The adidas Group is making strides in its goal of becoming a more responsive—and responsible—corporate citizen.

The German sportswear giant has released the results of a third party-conducted workplace ethics evaluation in a new report with a lengthy title: “Third Party Complaint Process for Breaches to the adidas Group Workplace Standards or Violations of International Human Rights Norms."

Outlining a series of first-of-its-kind processes for the company, the document opens with a bold statement: “The adidas Group is committed to operating as a sustainable business which is environmentally sound, respects human rights and ensures fair, safe and healthy working conditions across our global supply chain.” 

Though the company has had worker’s rights policies and complaint filing protocol in place for more than a decade, their grievance mechanisms haven't been successfully utilized, much to the detriment of the brand's cultural reputation. Now it's getting tougher on contact compliance, making contractors toe the line on treatment of workers and maintaining its corporate ethical standards.Continue reading...

bc q&a

Fur Real: 5 Questions with Brandi Halls, LUSH Cosmetics, on #MakeFurHistory

Posted by Sheila Shayon on November 6, 2014 10:32 AM

Cruelty-free cosmetics brand LUSH is reaching beyond the make-up counter to its very brand ethos with its latest anti-cruelty campaign, which targets the harsh realities of the fur industry. 

Nearly 500 international fashion designers—including Mulberry, Gucci and Fendi—showcase fur in their collections, and many use fur from the 100 million animals who are mistreated and then killed for their pelts annually, worldwide.

Mimi Bekhechi, PETA UK’s associate director, said of the fur industry, “With all the chic, cruelty-free options available on every high street, including ones which are warmer to boot, it is not only cruel but also utterly pointless to steal animals’ skins. Those who cater to every fashion whim with no sense of ethics are a dying breed.”

To bring awareness to the consumers that are most unaware of these facts, LUSH's campaign is cleverly centered around an online shopping hack.Continue reading...

sporting brands

FIFA is Feeling the Heat From Brand Partners Over Qatar World Cup

Posted by Mark J. Miller on November 4, 2014 12:19 PM

Brands like to be where the eyeballs are, but FIFA—organizers of the planet's most-watched sporting event, the World Cup—has just lost a major sponsor and is in danger of losing other brand sponsors in the wake of mishandling of recent events and allegations of corruption within the bidding process for World Cup hosting, Business Insider reports.

Emirates, FIFA's official airline partner, has pulled its sponsorship through the 2018 and 2022 World Cups, and Sony is considering the same, according to the Guardian. The loss of one and possible two FIFA partners hurts as there are only six sponsors in total at the FIFA Partner level, vs. sponsors specifically tied to the World Cup.Continue reading...

sustainability

Eco-Chic: Lexus, Kering Encourage Young Designers to Think Sustainably

Posted by Sheila Shayon on October 30, 2014 10:33 AM

These days, more and more consumers are demanding excellent design that doesn't compromise on environmental integrity as the greening of consumption continues to evolve.

Now two leaders in the luxury realm—French multinational fashion conglomerate Kering and Toyota-owned automaker Lexus—are embracing their ability to act as sustainability advocates with a global platform.

Kering, whose stable of designer brands includes Gucci, Bottega Veneta, Alexander McQueen, Christopher Kane and Stella McCartney, has demonstrated its investment in up-and-coming sustainable fashion stewards through a new partnership with the London College of Fashion. 

Together, the organizations have made a five-year commitment to encourage students to focus on using eco-friendly materials and methods. According to Vogue UK, two students each year whose collections embrace and elevate the ethical side of fashion design will receive an award of £31,500 as well as internships at Stella McCartney and Alexander McQueen.Continue reading...

sports in the spotlight

Sponsors Pressure FIFA Over Qatar Bid Ahead of World Cup Kickoff

Posted by Mark J. Miller on June 9, 2014 11:02 AM

The 2014 World Cup hasn't even gotten underway yet, but major sponsors of the event are already criticizing FIFA for its pick for the 2022 tournament host nation: Qatar. 

The selection of Qatar in December of 2010 immediately raised major concerns for a number of factors, including the punishing heat that the country suffers through during the traditional World Cup months of June and July; the country’s poor human-rights track record; the fact that Qatar doesn’t have much of a history with soccer; and that all of the stadiums for the event needed to be constructed (and will be white elephants after), among other issues that comedian John Oliver can explain for you.

Besides former US President Bill Clinton's total disappointment with the decision to skip the US and head to Qatar, investigators have now revealed that there were likely millions of dollars in bribes exchanged in order for Qatar to win the bid, The Guardian reports. The country has also come under fire for supposedly using "slaves" to help build the needed infrastructure for the event.

On top of everything else, the news of the illegal transactions now has official sponsors including adidas, Sony, Coca-Cola and Visa concerned about their association with the event. "Our expectation remains that all of our partners maintain strong ethical standards and operate with transparency,” Visa said, according to Associated Press.Continue reading...

sustainability

IKEA Future-Proofs its Brand, From Meatless Meatballs to Wind Turbines

Posted by Sheila Shayon on May 1, 2014 02:27 PM

Swedish retailer IKEA sold 97.4 million meatballs last year, a mash-up of beef and pork which accounted for a hefty portion of 600,000 tons of carbon dioxide emissions. While amounting to only about 2% of the company’s overall carbon footprint, it’s still too much for the global brand that’s made a name for itself as delivering good design and function at affordable prices.

“We didn’t want to have 5% of our range 'green' and ignore the rest,” commented Steve Howard, IKEA’s chief sustainability officer, to Fast Company. “If we think of the challenge—society is using 1 ½ planets’ worth of resources every year, and on track for more—business as usual isn’t an option. Sustainability has to be in every product in every customer’s home. It shouldn’t be a luxury for the few.”

So IKEA is putting its money and corporate citizenship on the line, from reconstituted chicken and vegetarian meatballs to solar panels, assembling a bold and proactive sustainability program to ‘future-proof’ its brand.Continue reading...

media meltdown

In Return to Print, Newsweek Captures Global Attention with Bitcoin Claims

Posted by Mark J. Miller on March 7, 2014 12:01 PM

Back on the newsstand after a near two-year hiatus during which it went digital-only, Newsweek made quite the splash this week with its Bitcoin cover story, which claimed a massive scoop: that the now IBT-owned media title had uncovered the true identity of the founder of the controversial digital currency.

Unfortunately, Newsweek’s big scoop may be a complete bust. The man who was fingered, Satoshi Nakamoto, a 64-year-old Japanese-American father of six who owns a single-family home in Southern California, claims he never even heard of Bitcoin unitl Newsweek contacted his son three weeks ago, the Associated Press reports. Newsweek stands by its story, which also says Nakamoto is worth about $400 million.

Since Bitcoin was first launched in 2009, fans, critics and curious consumers have been trying to uncover the true identity of supposed found Satoshi Nakamoto is, but to no avail. The man Newsweek has named, who was born Satoshi Nakamoto but later changed his name to Dorian Prentice Satoshi Nakamoto, now has reporters—and police—at his doorstep.Continue reading...

corporate citizenship

Primark Commits to Toxin-Free Products Following Greenpeace Campaign

Posted by Sheila Shayon on February 10, 2014 04:46 PM

Following in the steps of luxury brand Burberry, British retail giant Primark is the latest major brand to bow to Greenpeace's demands to go toxin-free, agreeing to eliminate hazardous chemicals in its products and across its production eco-system by 2020.

The High Street discount retailer is the 20th company to commit to detoxing its garments as a result of Greenpeace's global Detox campaign, and most recently, its "Little Monsters" report that found levels of toxins in childrens' product from global retail brands including Adidas, Gap, and American Apparel. Other brands, including Levi's, Zara, Mango and H&M have already commited to Greenpeace's five-step detox program. 

“Primark’s commitment shows that it refuses to be left behind as toxic-free clothing becomes a fashion trend in the industry,” said Ilze Smit, Detox Campaigner at Greenpeace International in a press release. “From budget retailers like Primark, to luxury houses like Burberry, brands are helping put an end to this toxic nightmare. Laggards like adidas and Disney need to act now to stop these hazardous little monsters once and for all.”Continue reading...

elsewhere on brandchannel

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
brandcameo2014 Product Placement Awards
Apple loses its crown to a new #1
Coca-ColaIt's the Journey That Matters:
Coca-Cola Opens Up With Story-Based Web Refresh
debateJoin the Debate
Is product placement a waste of money?
Arthur Chinski and Joshua Mizrahi
Model Behavior? Brands Beware
U.S. Legal Changes Impact Use of Brand Ambassadors
paperCorporate Citizenship in Canada
Fresh thinking from Interbrand
Sheryl Connelly
Sheryl Connelly

Meet Ford's Resident Futurist
LanamrqLanmarq
Highlighting the Present—and Future—of Branding in Latin America and Iberia

Advertisements