brand mascots

Fukuppy: Japan's Latest Attempt at Mascot Greatness Has the World Snickering

Posted by Abe Sauer on October 15, 2013 11:52 AM

When the reaches of humanity's ability to create art looks for a metaphoric warning to address the disastrous arrogance of science, it creates Godzilla, a lasting icon of the world's nuclear past. When the reaches of humanity's ability to create public relations campaigns looks for a mascot to address the disastrous arrogance of science, it creates Fukuppy, a lasting icon of the world's nuclear present.

Welcome to Earth, Fukuppy; you will go down as one of the top three worst mascots of all time.

To get the giggles and eye rolls out of the way up front, "Fukuppy" is the new mascot for Fukushima Industries, a manufacturer of refrigerators. The damaged Fukushima nuclear reactor, which just saw radiation levels hit a two-year high, is located in Fukushima prefecture.

In the wake of the (ongoing) Kumamon craze, brandchannel recently explored "Japan's robust history of anthropomorphized mascots" and how it fits into the island nation's "kawaii culture" ("kawaii" means "cute" or "adorable"). This cultural, maybe compulsive need to give every single thing its own adorable anthropomorphized mascot probably goes a long way in explaining the thinking behind Fukushima Industries' cute new spokes-egg.Continue reading...

sip on this

Beverage Brands' Creative Offerings Will Leave You With More Than That Refreshing 'Ahh'

Posted by Dale Buss on September 10, 2013 06:29 PM

Maybe it's the result of the unrelenting slide in conventional soft-drink sales. Or maybe the serendipitous byproduct of PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi's strategy for integrating snacking and refreshment experiences that used to be separate. But the company is coming up with more interesting sensory mashups these days.

For example, PepsiCo is seeking to patent a method of encapsulating scents within beverage packaging to entice US consumers with "favorable aromas" before they drink the beverage, according to BeverageDaily.com. The "aroma delivery system" would use one or more compounds encapsulated in gelatine capsules that are broken when a drink container is opened, the publication said.

"Consumers evaluate many products by the aroma emitted from the product or the container in which the product is made available," wrote the inventors in the patent, which was filed last year and published earlier this year. "Edible products, such as juices and coffee, are expected to have a fresh aroma that replicates or evokes memory of the epxected flavor of the product."Continue reading...

mobile brands

Apple Eyes Emerging Markets with Colorful 5C, but 'Forward Thinking' 5S May Fall to Competitors

Posted by Sheila Shayon on September 10, 2013 05:11 PM

The mobile industry's most highly anticipated event of the year has come and gone, leaving some innovation in its wake—but very little surprise. 

Today's iPhone event at Apple's Cupertino, Calif. headquarters confirmed a handful of rumors that have been circulating for weeks: two iPhones, the upgraded 5S and the more affordable, plastic 5C. The colorful 5C, which is essentially the iPhone 5 in a plastic shell, is the company's first foray into a value-centric device—a metric that will lend itself well in important mobile markets like China and India.

Available globally on Sept. 20, the two new devices will grant the company access into markets where it has previously encountered obstacles, though Cook and his colleagues did not mention any specific deal with China Mobile, the country's largest mobile provider. They did, however, highlight several providers in Japan that will offer the new iPhones

While more was revealed—additional details of iOS 7, updated camera functions, a new, faster processor chip—there was no mention of wearables, including Apple's eventual release of its rumored iWatch, leaving it more difficult to declare a winner in the latest mobile wars, especially between Apple and rival Samsung, which debuted its Galaxy Gear smartwatch and new Galaxy Note phablet last week.Continue reading...

brand strategy

Subaru Appreciates the 'Love,' But Now Brand Must Figure Out How to Return It

Posted by Dale Buss on August 29, 2013 10:46 AM

Nearly every auto brand in the US market has been trying to find ways to keep up with the boom in sales, from adding manufacturing capacity in America to raising prices. But no other brand is in the fix that Subaru is in.

Well, actually it's not a fix: Subaru is selling a lot more cars these days than it used to, but the brand is so small, with just 2.6 percent of the US market, that leadership of the brand and parent Fuji Heavy Industries is in a quandary about how how to respond to the brand's mini-boom.

Subaru's US sales were up by 27 percent for the year through July, more than three times the rate of increase for the market overall, and it faces shortages of its newest models. So while Subaru keeps gaining American fans with its rugged, all-wheel-drive vehicles and quirky advertising about "love" for its cars, it may not actually be able to sell them anything.Continue reading...

china

The Week in China: Jet Li Crop Art, Apple's 3-Piece, Budget Mooncakes and more

Posted by Abe Sauer on August 23, 2013 12:43 PM

China is the second largest economy in the world and every significant brand's future is impacted by its growth (or collapse)—but who's got the time?! Here's the week's reads that will make you look like a keen China observer in case you find yourself immersed in a cultural conversation.

This week: the "Apple three piece set"… budget mooncake… Robert Downey Jr's HTC ad translated… Wu Mo for Baidu… living in a KFC... GlaxoSmithKline... AmCham… Imax espionage… "China's Boston"… Shanghai Lacoste… Fruit Ninja advertising… Hong Kong air… marketing with "Singlish" and more.Continue reading...

brand challenges

With Another Failed Foreign Venture to its Name, Tesco Turns its Focus Back to Britain

Posted by Abe Sauer on August 13, 2013 12:58 PM

After nearly a decade of trying to crack the retail egg that is China, Tesco, the world's No. 3 retailer has thrown in the towel. 

The British retailer announced plans to create a joint venture with China's state-owned China Resources Enterprise Ltd., which would marry Tesco's 131 China stores with CRE's nearly 3,000 Vanguard units across China and Hong Kong, creating over $15 billion in sales—much more than Tesco's reported China sales of $2 billion. The deal, though, wipes out the Tesco name from the Asian market, as the retailer will only assume a 20 percent stake in the new venture, Reuters reports

"This may look win-win, but in reality, Tesco is saying 'I can't figure out China,'" one analyst told Reuters. Like many other foreign retailers before them, Tesco struggled to carve out a solid brand identity for itself among the fast-growing China market, where Walmart and France's Carrefour have been the only foreign supermarket brands that have managed to compete with local outlets.Continue reading...

health fallout

Kanebo's Goodwill Pays Off as Skin Lightening Industry Shrugs Off Scare

Posted by Adeline Chong on August 5, 2013 05:45 PM

Kanebo's voluntary recall across Asia of its skin-whitening product range in early July was a wakeup call for consumers as well as the skin lightening industry. Kanebo, the second largest cosmetics company in Japan after giant Shiseido, sells products in over 50 countries across Asia, Europe, and the US, with its whitening products comprising nearly 30 percent of its skincare range. 

Nearly two months before its July 4 recall, a clinic reported to Kanebo that three patients had complained of skin damage following use of a Kanebo whitening product. The company withheld the information for over a month before notifying the government and issuing a recall, a move that garnered worldwide criticism. The products, which gradually lighten the skin, are a part of a $13 billion industry in Asia alone, where fair skin has long been associated with an elevated social class.Continue reading...

traveling brands

Uber Enters Asia Slowly—And with On-Demand Ice Cream

Posted by Adeline Chong on July 29, 2013 02:42 PM

In many Asian cities, a wait for a taxi during peak hours can seem interminable. Uber, an app-based private car service, which aims to become "Everyone's Private Driver", has begun its rollout in Asia to hopefully end that.

The luxury car service, which was launched in 2010 and counts Amazon's Jeff Bezos and Goldman Sachs as investors, enters into a market awash with private cab companies and luxury mobile services that cater to Asia's business elite. Uber is no different, as it has entered Singapore, as well as Seoul and Taipei with premium priced services like UberBLACK, which shuttles passengers around in luxury sedans and SUVs. 

In Singapore, for example, the S$7 base fare is double the S$3.00 to S$3.50 flag-down rate of taxis, with a minimum fare of S$12. The eventual fare can be three times that of a taxi fare, compared to a premium of 20- to 50 percent for Uber car rides in the US. However, the ride is typically in a Mercedes-Benz S-Class sedan, a far step above the economy vehicles that are available for typical taxi rides. However, Uber is not the only one offering luxury jaunts, as it faces competition from Comfort and Premier cab companies. The competition is only greater in other Asian cities, especially those in China and Japan.Continue reading...

elsewhere on brandchannel

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
brandcameo2014 Product Placement Awards
Apple loses its crown to a new #1
Coca-ColaIt's the Journey That Matters:
Coca-Cola Opens Up With Story-Based Web Refresh
debateJoin the Debate
Is product placement a waste of money?
Arthur Chinski and Joshua Mizrahi
Model Behavior? Brands Beware
U.S. Legal Changes Impact Use of Brand Ambassadors
paperCorporate Citizenship in Canada
Fresh thinking from Interbrand
Sheryl Connelly
Sheryl Connelly

Meet Ford's Resident Futurist
MetaluxuryMeta-Luxury
Brands and the pursuit of excellence

Advertisements