trademark wars

Trademark Watch: Honey Badger Don't Care, Fish Sauce Wars and more

Posted by brandchannel staff on September 16, 2014 06:02 PM

Creator of "Honey Badger Don't Care" Brand Sues for Trademark Infringement (UPI)

"Defendants not only sold infringing merchandise, but strategically chose to advertise their infringing merchandise by using plaintiff's video, which was generating millions of views. Defendants even provided a website link to plaintiff's video, right alongside their advertisements of infringing merchandise, causing customer confusion and ramping up unlawful sales in the process."  

In Court, a Trademark Battle Turns Personal for Two Fish Sauce Makers (Los Angeles Times)

"Last week's federal trademark trial between the two fish sauce companies pitted a family-owned, three-decade behemoth in the Asian food industry that sells five lines of fish sauce against a newcomer that prides itself on making a premium, artisan version that has become the darling of celebrity chefs. The testimony ventured beyond the legal technicalities of trademark law into the personal stories behind the making of the odoriferous sauce."Continue reading...

brand and bottle

Bud Light's Whatever is a ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Brand Campaign

Posted by Abe Sauer on September 12, 2014 05:46 PM

As if sent by Snapchat, the new light beer campaigns accompanying a new football season are too often self-erasing. Remember Bud Light's campaign "theme" last football season? Miller Lite's? Coors'? We didn't think so.

Aside from occasional great Super Bowl ads and Bud's "Wassssssup?" home run, mainstream beer advertising is insipid, loud, fast, still often shockingly chauvinistic, overly complicated and, worst of all, brand interchangeable. Is it any wonder sales of craft and imported beer brands, which offer substance and character, have skyrocketed, especially among Millennials?

Now along comes Bud Light with "Whatever," perhaps the most appropriately named mainstream beer campaign ever. Luckily for Bud, its Whatever campaign is turning out to be somewhat memorable. Unluckily for Bud, it's because it's for the wrong reasons. And yes, Vanilla Ice—yes, that one—is involved. Continue reading...

trademark wars

Trademark Watch: Deadmau5 vs. Disney, Twitter vs. Twitpic and more

Posted by Courtney Cantor on September 5, 2014 05:05 PM

Now ear this: Canadian DJ Joel Zimmerman, better known by his stage name Deadmau5, is entangled in a trademark dispute with Disney after the media giant filed a 171-page document in opposition to the DJ’s US trademark registration. 

Disney has argued that the Deadmau5 mouse-shaped headgear, which Zimmerman wears while performing, is too similar to their staple Mickey ears. Though the two mice logos are reminiscent in their shape and structure, Deadmau5 has received trademark rights over the mark in over 30 countries, including the UK, Japan, and Italy.

Even so, a foreign registration should have little or no bearing on how the US Trademark Trial and Appeals Bureau (TTAB) decides the dispute. The TTAB will look at the marks as they are used in the United States, and any potential confusion in light of the American public. There are many interesting angles to the case.

Zimmerman has kept the public abreast of the case with a flood of tweets, telling Disney to “Lawyer up”, and posting his own cease and desist letter claiming Disney has infringed on his copyright to the song “Ghosts ‘n’ Stuff.” The copyright claim is unrelated, but it shows that Zimmerman is up for a fight—as is Disney, of course.Continue reading...

trademark wars

Chanel vs. Chanel: Coco's Brand Steps Off the Runway and Into the Courtroom

Posted by Courtney Cantor on September 4, 2014 04:04 PM

Chanel is ubiquitous—on the runway each fashion week, in its boutiques lining Fifth Avenue and Rodeo Drive, and now in the courtroom as it seeks to uphold its trademark rights against a little-known salon and spa in Indiana. Merrillville, Indiana, to be precise.

According to papers filed in the US District Court in Hammond, Indiana, Chanel Inc. has filed a trademark infringement action against Chanel’s Salon, arguing that the salon is benefiting from an association with the chi-chi brand’s reputation. The brand also claims it has sent cease and desist letters that have been ignored.

The fame of the Chanel trademark is hardly disputable, a factor weighing in the luxury brand’s favor. When the average consumer thinks of Chanel, images of that expensive interlocking C logo are likely to come to mind. The strength of the Chanel trademark is only one factor, however, that the court would consider in deciding whether the salon’s use is confusing to the public and therefore infringing on the brand’s rights.Continue reading...

cause marketing

With No Trademark Protection, Ice Bucket Challenge is Open to All

Posted by Mark J. Miller on September 2, 2014 05:12 PM

Bill Gates and Jennifer Lopez have done it. Martha Stewart and Donald Trump have, too. Your friends and neighbors have probably shown off their efforts on social media. Perhaps even you have done it.

“It,” of course, is the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, the viral awareness campaign that has raised over $100 million towards research for ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease.

The Challenge, which was briefly the focus of a US Patent and Trademark Office application that has since been pulled, is still going strong on social media channels around the globe, and in turn is inspiring other causes to attempt to adopt viral, "Challenge"-inspired campaigns.Continue reading...

trademark wars

Trademark Watch: Ice Bucket Challenge, Hershey, High Times and more

Posted by Courtney Cantor on August 29, 2014 08:04 PM

Since the end of July, the ALS Association, which fights Lou Gehrig’s disease through research, care and education, has raised over $100 million thanks to the viral Ice Bucket Challenge. Now it seeks to use that money, in part, to trademark the phrase “Ice Bucket Challenge” in connection with charitable fundraising.

In deciding whether ALS’s application for trademark registration will be successful, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) will take into consideration the Ice Bucket Challenge in light of how consumers view it. Although the association between ALS and the Ice Bucket Challenge is as clear as the water in the bucket, others have also begun to use the phrase to create awareness for different causes. For example, Matt Damon used the Ice Bucket Challenge to promote his clean water organization, Water.org, and several other "challenges" for charitable causes have popped up over the last month. 

Some argue that the USPTO should not allow the ALS Association to register the mark because it will prevent other charities from raising money by using the Ice Bucket Challenge. However, even if the association is granted trademark rights, charities should not get cold feet. After all, there are plenty of creative ways to get around this by still taking inspiration from the success of the Ice Bucket Challenge. Warm Water Challenge, anyone?Continue reading...

trademark wars

Trademark Watch: Coinye Gets Caught, Seattle's 12, Washington ____ and more

Posted by Nicole Briggs on August 22, 2014 07:14 PM

From the lyrics of Yeezus himself, “Oh when it all, it all falls down, I’m telling you all, it all falls down," and earlier this week it all fell down for the virtual currency Coinye in Kanye West’s triumphant trademark-infringement lawsuit.

Back in January, the famous rapper sued websites involving the operators of Coinye, the logo for a web-based currency. Coinye featured a cartoon likeness of Kanye West, in half-man, half-fish form, wearing West's signature shutter sunglasses.

On Wednesday, West won a default judgment against the operators of Coinye when the defendants failed to timely respond to the allegations, and permanently banned them from the “Kanye West” mark or any parody of it. In July, cases against four other defendants were settled out of court.Continue reading...

trademark wars

Trademark Watch: Redskins Appeal, Tesco Dashed, Don't Cross Warner Bros.

Posted by Jerome McDonnell on August 15, 2014 04:04 PM

It's a busy time for trademark watchers, as brands including the Quaker Oats-owned Aunt Jemima and the Clif and Kind health bars have found themselves tussling over trademarks. Some other trademark news of note:

As expected... The Washington Redskins are appealing a federal decision to cancel the team's trademarks. “We believe that the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board ignored both federal case law and the weight of the evidence, and we look forward to having a federal court review this obviously flawed decision,” Bob Raskopf, trademark attorney for the Washington Redskins, stated. Fierce lobbying on both sides includes a new video supporting the team's controversial name, counteracting a video during the Super Bowl protesting the name.

Tesco hopes dashed: European supermarket giant Tesco was rebuffed in its attempt to trademark the blue dashes underlining its iconic wordmark, as the UK's Intellectual Property Office ruled that the logo's Tevrons (as Tesco insiders call them) were too simple and not distinctive enough to merit trademark protection. While simplicity may be the ultimate sophistication, for trademarks, it's better to be complicated.

Who wants to live forever? In the midst of the mourning over the passing of Robin Williams and Lauren Bacall this week, Mondaq.com took at look at the actors' respective personal trademark registrations and praises both for savvy personal brand management. After all, patents expire and copyright runs its course—but (only) trademarks can last forever...Continue reading...

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