Best Global Green Brands 2014

ready for takeoff

Spirit Airlines: No Longer Content to be the Honey Badger of Brands

Posted by Mark J. Miller on May 7, 2014 03:17 PM

Spirit Airlines may be a discount airline but it has received plenty of press in recent years for all of the fees (or as Spirit likes to call it, "optional services") it has charged customers, such as a fee for printing a boarding pass at the airport, or cost-cutting that shoehorns a dozen extra seats than competitors within the same size plane.

That kind of move has "won" the brand such accolades as being the only U.S. carrier on the World's Worst Airlines and the worst-performing U.S. airline. It has been recognized for hiring the "rudest flight attendants" and being the "most complained about" airline. It has inspired such venom that customers have formed Boycott Spirit Airlines and Spirit Airlines Sucks groups, not to mention the requisite nod by The Onion.

Yet none of that seemed to bother its leadership team. Being the honey badger of brands for just not giving a damn was a badge of dishonor that Spirit wore proudly—or at least wore—until now.Continue reading...

e-commerce

Alibaba IPO: Open Sesame, Open Brand

Posted by Sheila Shayon on May 7, 2014 10:24 AM

E-commerce juggernaut Alibaba Group, the largest e-commerce company in China and arguably the largest in the world, filed Monday for a $1 billion IPO that is expected to be the largest tech IPO ever, and make Alibaba the second-biggest internet company in the world after Google.

Dubbed "the hottest thing" in tech right now by former Apple CEO John Sculley, Alibaba is expected to go public with a market cap of around $165 billion, while some analysts think it may top $200 billion.

Now the trick will be to build trust in its brand beyond China—no mean feat for the company whose IPO triggered 1,000 "explainers" today by Western media outlets.Continue reading...

sports in the spotlight

Branded Entertainment Extends FIFA World Cup Fever Off the Field

Posted by Mark J. Miller on May 5, 2014 04:43 PM

In just over a month, the world's top soccer players will take to the field and do battle from June 12 to July 13 in soccer's quadrennial blockbuster event, the FIFA World Cup. Big brands, though, are already tangling and showing their soccer cred in hopes of winning the hearts and minds of the billions that get a glimpse of the World Cup. The Super Bowl is nothing compared with this.

With a relationship with FIFA dating back to 1974, and as an official sponsor of the FIFA World Cup since 1978, Coca-Cola is celebrating this year's event with what it's billing as the largest marketing campaign in company history, entitled The World's Cup. Aimed at involving as many consumers as possible, the campaign kicked off in early April with a two-minute short film, called "One World, One Game."Continue reading...

what's in a name

iWatch What Happens: Swatch Defends Trademark Against Apple

Posted by Mark J. Miller on May 5, 2014 02:21 PM

As brands embrace wearable tech and personal computing starts moving to the wrist (or other body parts), Apple fans and foes are on the lookout for its much-anticipated “iWatch,” a piece of wearable tech (that may not even be a watch) that has been elevated to such high status that George Jetson would covet it and a veteran luxury marketer—former Burberry CEO Angela Ahrendts—will help sell it.

It remains to be seen what Apple will eventually turn out, but one thing is now clear: Swatch, the world’s largest watchmaker, is ready to protect its ground. Having kept its lawyers busy chasing Target and Tiffany, the Swiss firm recently filed complaints against Apple’s application for the iWatch trademark, which is now starting to pop up, because it is too similar to its trademarked iSwatch product, according to media outlets including Bloomberg and the London Telegraph

The iWatch trademark was registered by Apple last year in Japan, Mexico, and Turkey. There has been no move to take Apple to court, but Swatch would certainly prefer that Apple not use iWatch for the consumer-facing product when it launches. “We assess the likelihood of confusion as [high], given the marks are confusingly similar. In all countries where the mark is registered” Swatch intends to stop Apple from using the name, a Swatch rep told the Telegraph.Continue reading...

lather, rinse, rebrand

Visa Elevates Digital Payments with New 'Everywhere' Brand Identity

Posted by Alicia Ciccone on January 14, 2014 10:51 AM

In today's digital world, consumers can complete transactions in nearly any setting: in a store, restaurant, on the go, and relatively in the middle of nowhere. Thanks to technology, making and accepting payments has never been easier to access, which is the defining principle behind the launch of Visa's new brand identity. 

As it prepares to venture to Sochi next month as a major partner of the Winter Olympic Games, Visa has embraced both the past and present in introducing its new tagline, "Everywhere You Want to Be." The 55-year-old digital payments company also introduced a refreshed logo, all of which will debut in the US in Visa's Sochi ad campaign.

The company has drawn on its past tagline, "It's everywhere you want to be," and spun it forward, as "everywhere" now takes on new meaning in a mobile, digital world.Continue reading...

rebranding

Intel Sheds Troubled McAfee Name in Antivirus Rebrand

Posted by Mark J. Miller on January 7, 2014 05:36 PM

John McAfee created an antivirus program that became the industry standard, making him an unbelievably wealthy man. But since splitting from the company in 1994, McAfee's wealth—and personal reputation—have taken a tumble, especially after he hid out in Belize while being considered a "person of interest" in a murder investigation—and blogged about it.

But McAfee's antics have also drawn some negative attention to Intel, which bought McAfee Inc. in 2010. Now, after grappling with McAfee's outspoken opinions and unruly actions, the company announced it will be officially rebranding the security software, devoid of McAfee's name. 

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich announced the change at the Consumer Electronics Show, where Intel is busy unveiling new efforts in wearable tech. While the McAfee sheild logo will remain, the software—which will be made available for free on mobile devices—will now be known as Intel Security, a change that is estimated to take a year to implement.Continue reading...

brand strategy

#Hercules Bowls Over Northeast, Nabbing Another Social Win for Weather Channel

Posted by Sheila Shayon on January 3, 2014 04:07 PM

What’s in a name? Everything if you’re in storm branding—the latest battleground for weather services eager to claim mindshare in an increasingly crowded media space.

This week's Nor'easter was called the "East Coast Blizzard" by AccuWeather, "Major Winter Storm" by the National Weather Service, "Bethany" in Connecticut, and "Hercules" by The Weather Channel and most everyone else, including Governors Chris Christie and Andrew Cuomo, who both tweeted messages about the storm using the TV/web/mobile network's #Hercules hashtag. 

In addition to annoying horror writer Stephen King (who dubbed the practice "dorky" to his Twitter followers) and other weather-watching brands by pushing Athena, Sandy and Nemo, The Weather Channel's practice of branding storms (this Western winter season, with the help of a high school Latin class in Bozeman, Montana) has irked the World Meteorological Organization, a 191-member organization based in Geneva.Continue reading...

campaigns

What the L? Staples Hopes to Make More Happen with Emphasis On Broad Inventory

Posted by Mark J. Miller on January 2, 2014 03:12 PM

Staples wants customers to know that it isn't all just work, work, work. Well, it might be all work, but the office supply retailer has set out on a new campaign to show consumers that is stocks products for all kinds of work places, from doctors offices to retailers. 

The brand has been adding thousands of products in order to boost its position as the second largest online retailer in the world. It now carries everything a wide variety of workspaces might need, from stethoscopes to mannequins. Along with the addition of products comes a new marketing campaign, “Make More Happen,” with a memorable (or make that "memorab e") tagline.

The cornerstone of the new campaign, which aims to show how Staples sells more than "just" office supplies, is a campaign that removes the "L" from its name, including on store signage, to make consumers stop in their tracks and rethink the brand.Continue reading...

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