brand news

Brand News: Target, Girl Scouts, Pfizer and more

Posted by Shirley Brady on May 26, 2014 09:15 AM

TOP 5 STORIES

Brands to Watch

Target Canada head makes aggressive 30-day guarantee as Target US hires Magna exec and talks up Altuzarra collaboration. 

General Mills, the Girl Scouts of the USA and Tootsie Roll take action on e-cigarettes using their product brand names.

Sony forms alliance for China PlayStation in Microsoft challenge as CEO touts wearable gaming.

Pfizer abandons AstraZeneca contentious bid.

New US gun control ads resonate in wake of Memorial Day Weekend mass shooting.

MORE BRAND NEWS

Apple seeks retrial and court order blocking sale of older Samsung phones as smart home system rumored for WWDC.

Carnival CEO addresses cruise industry challenges.

China plans to scrap millions of cars over emission standards.

Chipotle looks beyond the burrito.

Disneyland Paris opens Imagination Castle based on kids' drawings.

Hasbro exec dubbed "the father of G.I. Joe" has died, aged 86.

Heineken "shoe sale for women" campaign slammed as sexist.Continue reading...

mobile marketing

T-Mobile Dials In to Latino Community with Univision-Branded MVNO

Posted by Mark J. Miller on May 16, 2014 12:19 PM

As the fastest-growing demographic in the US, Latinos are the apple of every brand's eye as they look to hone in on the youthful, tech-savvy group. Now, the leading Hispanic media brand in the US—Univision—has partnered with T-Mobile to launch a customized wireless brand, Univision Mobile

The new network will offer "monthly plans that include 100 minutes of international calling to eight countries in Latin America, including Mexico, and unlimited text messaging to phone numbers in more than 200 countries around the world," according to the Los Angeles Times.

The branded MVNO, which goes live on Monday, will be sold through Walmart stores and select wireless dealers that cater to Latino communities. 

"We built the wireless service they told us they wanted from the ground up, instead of slapping a Spanish translation on top and calling it a service for Hispanic Americans, like the old-guard carriers do," Mike Sievert, T-Mobile's chief marketing officer, told the Times. Sievert, of course, is taking a swipe at Verizon's "Viva Movil" endeavor, which launched last year in partnership with Jennifer Lopez. Unlike Viva Movil, Univision Mobile will not open any stand-alone stores, and will only be marketed through authorized resellers.Continue reading...

brand news

In the News: Google, Instagram, MasterCard and more

Posted by Dale Buss on March 10, 2014 09:32 AM

In the News

Google looks to repeat Android success with wearable devices.

Instagram inks ad deal with Omnicom worth up to $100 million. 

MasterCard and Visa form payment-security group.

AT&T and T-Mobile rejigger wireless prices.

American Airlines and JetBlue end sales partnership.

Biomet files for IPO.

Boeing inspects undelivered Dreamliners for cracks and braces for any tarnish from Malaysian Airlines disaster.

Buffalo Wild Wings ramps up tablet rollout.

Cars.com goes on block for $3 billion.

Caterpillar and Sany argue over which is No. 1 in China excavator market.

Chipotle is asked to do sustainability reporting.

Chiquita buys Fyffes to create world's largest banana company.Continue reading...

video killed the _____ star

Verizon Looks to Mobile Streaming for Entry into TV Content

Posted by Mark J. Miller on March 5, 2014 07:34 PM

With net neutrality out the door and streaming the new "it" thing, TV providers and content producers are getting busy to strike deals.

Disney and Dish recently agreed to a long-term contract that will deliver all Disney-owned content, including ABC and ESPN, to the network's subscribers in exchange for Dish dropping its ad-skipping feature that was the focus of litigation between the two companies. And now Verizon is reportedly in talks with content providers to deliver web-based TV services to mobile phones. 

"I have personally had discussions with the CEOs of the large content companies, and we would love to partner with them to see how we can take FiOS contact mobilely across the country," Verizon CEO Lowell McAdam said Tuesday at the Morgan Stanley Technology, Media & Telecom Conference, Reuters reports. This comes after Verizon acquired Intel's OnCue service back in January to help it get into “next-generation video services” more quickly.Continue reading...

brand news

In the News: GM, Mondelez, Diet Coke and more

Posted by Dale Buss on March 5, 2014 09:33 AM

In the News

GM sees CEO Mary Barra personally takes over ignition-switch recall.

Mondelez sees digital-startup investments bear fruit.

Diet Coca-Cola raises eyebrows with "You're On" references.

Chevron gets huge win from US judge.

Chrysler pledges to keep minivan production in Canada but wants lower costs as slow sales hit Dodge Dart output.

Famous Dave's management continues to unravel.

GE CEO Jeff Immelt reassures investors by personally buying company stock.

Intel CMO Deborah Conrad to leave after 27 years at the company. 

Jaguar plans compact sedan with aluminum underbody.Continue reading...

brand news

In the News: Boeing, Volkswagen, Adidas and more

Posted by Dale Buss on February 27, 2014 09:28 AM

In the News

Boeing designs self-destructing "Mission Impossible" smartphone.

Volkswagen cuts European worker bonuses on slump in demand and recalls almost 600,000 vans. 

Adidas to stop selling sexually-suggestive World Cup T-shirts after outcry. 

Barnes & Noble swings to profit on cost-cutting. 

Best Buy posts sales decline but returns to profit with cost cuts. 

Bitcoin falls in crosshairs of nations' regulators. 

eBay leads $133.7 million investment in Indian shopping site Snapdeal. 

European Union bans e-cigarette ads. 

Ford gets Mustang tie-up to Need for Speed and improves convertible top to take on German rivals. 

GM now faces federal investigation of its handling of recall.Continue reading...

video killed the _____ star

Netflix Cuts Deal with Comcast to Pay for "Excellent User Experience"

Posted by Mark J. Miller on February 24, 2014 01:58 PM

Plenty of consumers complain each month about the amount of money they pay out to America's largest cable provider, Comcast, and now you can add Netflix to that list.

As a result of changes in net neutrality rules, Comcast has the ability to slow down video streams from any source it wishes. That’s bad news for a company like Netflix, whose millions of customers stream hundreds of bandwidth-sucking movies and TV series at all hours of the day. Recently, Netflix subscribers have been complaining of poor and slow connections, especially those who get their high-speed Internet from Comcast and Verizon's FiOS broadband networks.

In order to keep its own customer satisfaction high, Netflix and Comcast on Sunday confirmed last week's rumor that the companies had reached an undisclosed financial deal with a press release titled, "Comcast and Netflix Team Up to Provide Customers With Excellent User Experience."

The agreement will ensure Netflix's load time won't be slowed by Comcast's broadband nodes, a so-called "peering" deal that may likely be felt in US cable customers' bills down the line. It also got Net Neutrality crowd out in full force, on both sides of the debate.Continue reading...

video killed the _____ star

Netflix's Biggest Foe isn't HBO, It's the Internet Providers that Move Its Content

Posted by Sheila Shayon on February 19, 2014 07:32 PM

As the battle between Netflix and major internet service providers rages on, consumers are paying the price with degraded service.

The complicated plumbing required to deliver a Netflix video to a consumer’s computer or TV is near invisible to users, who are unaware of the bandwidth that companies have to put out in order to transmit such content. The actual data transfer occurs at global “interconnection” hubs, aka, “telecom carrier hotels” where companies like Time Warner Cable, Verizon and AT&T share space. Born in the days of high volume landline telephone traffic, the telcos shared amiably enough, but with the addition of high-bandwidth services like Netflix creating a drain, those relationships have broken down. And now broadband companies are increasingly charging "tolls" to third-party intermediate players like Level 3 and Cogent. 

“This is a scenario that open Internet advocates have been warning about for years," Time notes. “It’s no secret that the big telecom and cable companies resent the fact that they are obliged to deliver high bandwidth content like Netflix—which competes against their own video offerings—in addition to less bandwidth-intensive traffic like emails and chats.”Continue reading...

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