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Applebee's Now Selling Inflatable You, So Real You Can Sneak Out for Lunch

Posted by Dale Buss on July 26, 2012 12:27 PM

Life-size inflatable dolls can be used for all sorts of things. There's that trick of setting one in the passenger seat of your car to fool cops policing high-occupancy vehicle lanes, of course. And, well, anyway, an unusual new line of blow-up dolls is now being offered by a surprising source: Applebee's, the casual-dining chain.

They're called Lunch Decoys, and they can be propped up at desks and on assembly lines "to trick bosses and coworkers into thinking you're still hard at work while you're actually at Applebee's enjoying the delicious Pick 'N Pair Lunch menu," as a spokesperson put it. "Now Applebee’s not only offers a great lunch menu, but also a foolproof way to slip out of the office and get it." But wait, there's more!

Lunch Decoys are "available in both genders and a variety of wardrobes and ethnicities" and can be purchased on Amazon for $6.99 plus shipping and handling. The six decoys are called The Overachiever, the Self-Starter, the Executive, the Multi-Tasker, the Cubicle Queen, and the Go-Getter.

Will various aggrieved demographic groups sue for not getting their Lunch Decoys? Does Applebee's really expect coworkers to be fooled? Of course not — it's a tongue-in-cheek marketing stunt by those wags at CP+B. But they might get a chuckle out of it. And maybe join in to Pick 'N Pair lunch.

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