chew on this

Arby's Slices New Positioning Between US and Canada

Posted by Dale Buss on October 1, 2012 06:10 PM

Whether Arby's new ad campaigns in the U.S. and Canada will boost the chain's sales won't be known for a while. But give Arby's this: Its new promotions credit North American consumers with a certain intellectual dexterity.

That's because both the U.S. campaign, "Slicing Up the Truth About Freshness," and the brand's new "Believe the Unbelievable" campaign in Canada rely on viewers of the advertisements to "get" creative conceits that, even if understood, they may not find all that relevant to the process of determining what sandwich to cram down their gullets that day.

But they are clever. In the U.S., for example, Arby's is rolling out out a brand refresh with a new logo "as well as an ad campaign based on the notion that the fast feeder is "slicing up" the truth about how Arby's has been freshly slicing meat in its restaurants for nearly 50 years.

It's certainly a differentiator that few if any competitors can claim. And to drive the point home, the campaign — tongue in cheek — puts former New York City police detective Bo Dietl on "the case" to "expose the truth" about fresh slicing.

The refreshed logo also plays on the meat-slicing theme — it's described as an "updated, modernized logo that stays true to the iconic hat, but also communicates Arby's pride in freshly slicing meat daily in each restaurant." Expanding on its Hot Turkey Roasters as part of its re-launch, the US push also promotes the Grand Turkey Club.

Arby's meat-slicing run "is something we're extremely proud of," Arby's CMO Russ Klein said in a press release. "It's our belief that freshly sliced meat makes it a great sandwich." It's also his hope that the new tagline, "Slicing Up Freshness," and campaign will stand out on the many primetime TV shows that began running the new ads on Sunday. They also mark the commercial directing debut of Larry Charles, the Seinfeld writer turned director of comedy films including Borat.

In Canada, the campaign is even wackier, as Arby's enlists the help of "real people" who claim they've seen UFOs, ghosts and other manifestations of the paranormal. Why should people who believe in little green aliens be skeptical about a Roast Beef Three Cheese & Bacon sandwich? Check out the spots on the Arby's Canada YouTube channel and judge for yourself.

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