Google’s New Logo: Mobile, Simple and Friendly

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Google Doodle

With a Google Doodle version of a hand wave gesture, a new serif-free Google logo was revealed as part of the 17-year-old tech behemoth’s rebrand.

Using an in-house created typeface called Product Sans, Google wrote in a blog post, “We think we’ve taken the best of Google (simple, uncluttered, colorful, friendly), and recast it not just for the Google of today, but for the Google of the future.”

A “G” using the logo’s swirling colors replaces the iconic blue “G” while animated colored dots appear in response to a spoken command. Google calls its new features and functionality an “identity family” for a “constellation of devices.”

So why the change now? “We’ve taken the Google logo and branding, which were originally built for a single desktop browser page, and updated them for a world of seamless computing across an endless number of devices and different kinds of inputs (such as tap, type and talk).”

Bottom-line, serifs were a problem. “Google’s old logo did not shrink well,” notes Gizmodo. “A serif-y ‘Google’ with all those nubbins is not going to be readable at small sizes…The G almost turns into a C. The l looks like i. Coogie!”

Google

In addition to a scalability challenge, the original wordmark degraded at low resolution. Making Google more usable for all users was a motivating factor, writes the Google Design team. “The new logo’s reduced file size avoids this workaround and the consistency has tremendous impact when you consider our goal of making Google more accessible and useful to users around the world, including the next billion.”

Google

The change comes as Google reorganizes into Alphabet, the new corporate holding company that now counts Google as a subsidiary and has a slick and simple visual identity of its own.

Google Alphabet

“In creating Alphabet, Google executives introduced a new ecosystem—one that Google is part of, rather than one Google oversees,” reports Wired“In many ways, Google’s new design language mirrors its parent company’s, raising the question if this is the future of everything from Calico to Youtube. It wouldn’t be surprising. After all, Google’s new logo is all about where the world is going: mobile, simple and accessible everywhere.”

Yahoo, Netflix, Twitter and Snapchat have also simplified their logos as mobile is fast becoming the internet’s front door.

The new primary-colored capital “G” will be used as a “favicon” with various apps, Google+, Google Maps, etc. “Over time,” adds Wired, “the crisper ‘G’ could become akin to Apple’s apple—the only icon needed to represent the company.”

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